Books

AIR-PROOF GREEN (Poetry) 

air-proof-green-front _Page_1Order from Pedlar Press:

Air-Proof Green, Pedlar Press, 2013

ISBN: 9781897141571

“Poems in Maleea Acker’s second collection range over continents and countries, asking an essential question for our time: How do we live in the world? The poems seek always to approach that threshold between human and natural worlds, attending to what can be seen and sensed with a fine ear and eye. We meet one another at the threshold, through a “splice of intimacy,” displaced, the poet says, finding temporary homes and intimacies with one another and with all living things.”

GARDENS AFLAME: GARRY OAK MEADOWS OF BC’S SOUTH COAST (Non-Fiction)

Order  from New Star Books:

Gardens Aflame: Garry Oak Meadows on BC’s South Coast. New Star Books, 2012.

Browse the Gardens Aflame pages, including photos, media, links and miscellany.

“Acker’s wonderful little book is both a lyrical examination of this contested landscape and an ethical parable about how we should learn to live with the world as well as in it.” – Stephen Hume, “Books about BC make unique gifts,” Vancouver Sun, Dec. 14, 2012.

“Acker tells the story of her relationship with the Garry Oak Meadow and in doing so has shown how we all are a part of nature and how each of us is enriched by our relationship with it.  She tells of what we have lost and she tells of the joys and challenges in nature restoration. A fascinating book.” – Bill Turner, Founder, The Nature Conservancy of BC

THE REFLECTING POOL (Poetry)

Order from Pedlar Press:

The Reflecting Pool. Pedlar Press, 2009.

Read an interview with Rob McLennan on the book.

Visit Pedlar Press

“Reading Maleea Acker’s first collection, The Relecting Pool, packaged in a beautiful, textured volume, is a dreamy journey into image and metaphor: we follow a saturated path, where “[c]rickets trill, stars perambulate, valley falls into itself,” past cobwebs and birds, a church at noon, to where “ferns, moss, a bundle / of roots inched themselves into the built through a lens.” – The Malahat Review 172